What’s the best camera for food photography?

I know I’ve googled it myself. Especially when I was just beginning my food photography journey. I wanted to pin point the reason my images weren’t coming out the way I wanted them to so I assumed, surely it was my camera, right! The only cure? Drop thousands of dollars on a full frame, of course! Or so I thought…

Recently, I was asked what kind of camera I shoot with now. When I replied, a full frame, I was met with the response of – Oh yes, of course! Your images are so good, you must shoot with a full frame. While I appreciate anyone who enjoys my images it made me realize that often times people think it’s the camera that makes the images & not the photographer…

While yes, I do agree, there are differences that make a full frame more desirable to a photographer, I wanted to let you know that a full frame vs a crop sensor isn’t the deal breaker. It will not guarantee your images look better or worse. It can help you, certainly, but in the end, you are the one who controls your images.

One of the things that people tell me they love about my ebook, Eat Pretty Things, is my consistent commitment to encourage you to purchase with purpose. Don’t have thousands of dollars to drop on a new, full frame camera? Then don’t! Learn a new lighting technique. Play with aperture. Explore a new styling method. All of those things are free. And then, if the time is right & you’re ready to invest in a full frame camera, you can do so with confidence, knowing you earned that upgrade with all the diligent work you put into your crop sensor.

So let’s get to it, shall we? I wanted to prove to you that I could take consistently good images with both my crop sensor & my full frame. I’m leaving the judging up to you to see if you can tell which image came from which camera. I know myself, I had to carefully label & color code them in Lightroom just so I wouldn’t confuse them. But here we go…

  • Two images
  • Two cameras. Full frame & crop sensor.
  • Same subject
  • Same lighting
  • Same lens (Nikon 50mm f/1.8) & focal length (f/3.5) & shutter speed (125)
  • Same Kelvin setting for white balance (5000K)

Here are the two images side by side:

As I mentioned, I actually had to make sure I labeled the images both exporting & when editing them to make sure I kept the full frame images separate from the crop sensor images.

SO WHAT’S YOUR BEST GUESS? WHICH IMAGE WAS TAKEN WITH THE FULL FRAME & WHICH WAS TAKEN WITH THE CROP SENSOR CAMERA? WHAT IS THE BEST CAMERA FOR FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY?

Did you guess right? Were you surprised which camera took which image? Honestly, could you even tell a huge difference or would you have even thought these images were taken with two different cameras if I hadn’t told you?

So the moral of the story? While, yes, full frame cameras can be an awesome investment in your photography career, don’t forget, you make the awesome images. It’s not just about your gear!

Hungry for more food photography fun?

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